December 19, 2014

Listen to Coco read some of the best and most profane tweets from people who disagree with every breath she takes on the earth. Then, Coco gently tells them why they’re wrong; brutality is not strength and it’s not effective.

Coco also had the opportunity to interview Brian D’Agostino, President of the International Psychohistorical Association who explained why some people believe that brutality is strength and why those same people need scapegoats for their sense of security. Along the way, we play and comment on a few of the better songs that the CIA used in their torture tactics.

If you’re interested in buying a copy of Brian’s book, The Middle Class Fights Back: How Progressive Movements Can Restore Democracy in America, you can find it on Amazon. You can also find his contact information here, if you’d like to get in touch with him.

2 Comments

  • February 7, 2015 Reply

    DAVID GRAFF

    In 1955–the middle of the Cold War–my 5th grade teacher explained the difference between America and the Soviet Union as follows.

    In the Soviet Union, if there are ten murder suspects–one guilty, nine innocent–and they don’t know who is guilty, they execute all of them. In America, if there are ten murder suspects–nine guilty, one innocent–and we don’t know who is innocent, we let them all go free!

    How many innocent people were killed by napalm in Viet Nam? How many are now killed by drones? In America, how many innocent people have been freed from death row–and how many prosecutors have fought against their release so as not to mar their record? How many churchgoing Americans still support torture? How many believe that no one has the right to stop them from spanking their children?

    Many countries have made spanking a crime–including Germany!

    How do we define “civilized.” Or do we simply not want to think about it?

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